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Workplace mental health first aid means more than just box ticking

  • June 12, 2023

Clare Price, Director of Clinical Services at Onebright

For years there have been discussions about mental health first aid becoming a legal requirement in the workplace, but no Government to date has implemented a policy. It was good to see Mr. Russell re-introduce a bill in parliament in January, but we have to remember that it is very rare that ‘ten-minute bills’ such as this one become law.

The one thing it has done is get us all talking and thinking about how to best support employees and inspire effective change for the benefit of individuals across the country.

Previous studies have shown that providing mental health support can save businesses up to £8 billion* a year, with 70 million workdays being lost annually due to mental health-related issues. It is clear that companies at executive level should endorse mental health first aid in their organizational culture with open arms, however, it’s introduction should not become a way to tick a box.

With the introduction of remote and hybrid working over the years, businesses have had to adapt how they support their workforce, especially those who may find it difficult to cope with their mental and emotional wellbeing.

What to consider when implementing mental health first aid

The role of a mental health first aider sits entirely outside the role of HR, or senior management. They act as the first point of contact for employees to talk to when experiencing a mental health issue, which then helps sign post the employee to appropriate resources, whether that be an organizational support such as a wellbeing service or an Employee Assistance Program (EAP), or to their GP, the NHS or other recognized third sector and charity organisations.

The ease of accessibility to mental health first aiders is

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BC Attorney General David Eby announces bid to become premiere | iNFOnews

  • August 27, 2022

money laundering at the Legislature in Victoria on Wednesday, March 27, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito” src=”https://infotel.ca/images/news/cp/photos/20220719180752-62d73662eab2e1cc399f9647jpeg.jpg?q=90″ /

BC Attorney General David Eby (right) and then-federal minister of border security and organized crime reduction Bill Blair speak to media following a meeting to discuss money laundering at the Legislature in Victoria on Wednesday, March 27, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hippolito


Republished July 19, 2022 – 9:35 PM


Original Publication Date July 19, 2022 – 6:21 PM




VANCOUVER – British Columbia Attorney General David Eby has announced his bid to become the province’s next premier, saying he has secured the support of a large majority of New Democrat members of the legislature.

Eby’s announcement ends weeks of speculation as other high-profile New Democrats have bowed out of this fall’s leadership election, with the winner set to be announced on Dec. 3.

Premier John Horgan announced last month he would resign due to health reasons, following two bouts with cancer, paving the way for a new leader.

Notable cabinet ministers, including Jobs Minister Ravi Kahlon, Finance Minister Selina Robinson and Municipal Affairs Minister Nathan Cullen, have said they will not be vying for the top job, making Eby the contender to beat.

Eby is so far the only candidate running to replace Horgan, who has said he no longer has the energy to seek re-election.

In announcing his leadership bid, Eby told supporters at the Kitsilano Neighborhood House on Tuesday that more housing, affordable childcare and family doctors are needed for communities.

“Building public housing for middle-class families was something government never had to do when I was growing up,” he said, adding that’s needed because pressures in the housing market are pushing people onto the street.

He said rent-to-own, long-term

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