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Bill would require landlords to inform tenants of legal aid when issuing evictions

  • May 7, 2023

Published: 5/1/2023 11:08:36 AM

Modified: 5/1/2023 11:08:10 AM

New Hampshire senators are considering a bill that would require landlords to provide information on legal aid to tenants who are being evicted.

House Bill 379which passed the House on a voice vote earlier this month, would mandate that eviction notices given to tenants also include the contact information for New Hampshire Legal Assistance, which helps represent low-income residents in eviction cases.

At a hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee Thursday, Rep. Ellen Read, a Newmarket Democrat and the bill’s prime sponsor, said informing tenants of their rights could help reduce unnecessary evictions. The bill was intended to address situations where legal representation could have actually made a difference – where a judge might have ruled in the tenant’s favor if they had counsel and had submitted the proper motions, Read said.

Landlords often do have attorneys they rely on as part of their business. Read said, arguing that HB 379 would help tenants balance the scales.

“If you’re against it, you’re saying that you want to keep a tenant in the dark so that they don’t have the ability to get their legal counsel that they should have by right,” she said. “In other words, you as a landlord want an unfair advantage in court.”

The bill is supported by New Hampshire Legal Assistance, which provides assistance in conjunction with 603 Legal Aid.

But Nick Norman, the director of legislative affairs for the Apartment Association of New Hampshire, said the association had concerns the bill could cause evictions to be voided in court because landlords did not provide adequate information.

Norman submitted an amendment to direct the court system instead of issuing the notice to tenants.

“There’s a concern, structurally, if you put – the way this is worded –

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NH bill would require landlords to inform tenants of legal aid when issuing evictions

  • May 6, 2023

New Hampshire state senators are considering a bill that would require landlords to provide information on legal aid to tenants who are being evicted.

House Bill 379which passed the House on a voice vote earlier this month, would mandate that eviction notices given to tenants also include the contact information for New Hampshire Legal Assistance, which helps represent low-income residents in eviction cases.

The bill is supported by New Hampshire Legal Assistance, which provides assistance in conjunction with 603 Legal Aid.

The bill is supported by New Hampshire Legal Assistance, which provides assistance in conjunction with 603 Legal Aid.

At a hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee Thursday, April 27, Rep. Ellen Read, a Newmarket Democrat and the bill’s prime sponsor, said informing tenants of their rights could help reduce unnecessary evictions. The bill was intended to address situations where legal representation could have actually made a difference – where a judge might have ruled in the tenant’s favor if they had counsel and had submitted the proper motions, Read said.

Landlords often do have attorneys they rely on as part of their business. Read said, arguing that HB 379 would help tenants balance the scales.

“If you’re against it, you’re saying that you want to keep a tenant in the dark so that they don’t have the ability to get their legal counsel that they should have by right,” she said. “In other words, you as a landlord want an unfair advantage in court.”

The bill is supported by New Hampshire Legal Assistance, which provides assistance in conjunction with 603 Legal Aid.

But Nick Norman, the director of legislative affairs for the Apartment Association of New Hampshire, said the association had concerns the bill could cause evictions to be voided in court because landlords did not provide adequate information.

Norman submitted an amendment to direct the court system instead of issuing the notice to tenants.

“There’s

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Judge in archdiocese bankruptcy case recuses himself over donations scandal | New Orleans

  • May 2, 2023

A federal judge overseeing a bankruptcy filing from the US’s second-oldest Roman Catholic archdiocese has recused himself from the case amid scrutiny of his donations to the church as well as his close professional relationship with an attorney representing archdiocesan affiliates in insurance disputes.

Greg Guidry, who was appointed to the judicial bench at New Orleans’s federal courthouse by the Donald Trump White House in 2019, issued an order after 8pm on Friday recusing himself from a role handling appeals in a contentious bankruptcy involving nearly 500 clergy sexual abuse victims.

It came a week after the Associated Press reported that he had donated tens of thousands of dollars to the archdiocese before consistently ruling in favor of New Orleans’s Catholic church during its Chapter 11 bankruptcy filing. And Guidry’s ruling came hours after the Guardian had joined the AP in asking questions about a lawyer who was involved in making those donations while his firm defended archdiocesan-related ministries – such as assisted living homes – and the church itself as an employer in medical malpractice lawsuits.

“I do not believe [recusal] is mandated, and no party has filed a motion to [recuse] me,” Guidry’s order read. “However, balancing my duty to decide the case with my duty to consider self-recusal if appropriate, I have decided to recuse myself from this matter in order to avoid any possible appearance of personal bias or prejudice.”

Guidry’s order on Friday marked a stark reversal of course from just a week earlier, when he told attorneys involved in the bankruptcy case that a federal judiciary committee on codes of conduct had approved his continuing to handle appeals related to the case despite his giving nearly $50,000 to New Orleans-area Catholic charities from leftover contributions he received after serving 10 years in the elected

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