district attorney

More

This Texas district attorney is one of dozens who have vowed not to prosecute abortion

  • July 11, 2022

Updated June 29, 2022 at 10:40 AM ET

The US Supreme Court’s reversal of Roe v. Wade leaves decisions about abortion access up to states, many of which have moved quickly to limit it.

And while dozens of states were prepared with trigger laws that would immediately ban or restrict abortions, some are now encountering obstacles in implementation and enforcement. The pushback is coming from within their own borders, in the form of legal challenges from abortion rights advocates and opposition from local prosecutors.

Judges in states including Louisiana and Utah have temporarily blocked abortion bans from taking effect in order to hear challenges against them. And dozens of local prosecutors across the country have publicly pledged not to prosecute people who seek, facilitate or provide abortions.

in a joint statement originally issued Friday, 88 elected prosecutors — mostly district attorneys and attorneys general — vowed not to prosecute abortions, calling the criminalization of abortion care “a mockery of justice.”

The prosecutors come from counties in both blue and red states, including those with strict anti-abortion laws including Georgia and Texas. They collectively represent more than 91.5 million people from 30 states and territories as well as Washington, DC, according to Fair and Just Prosecutionthe group that organized and distributed the statement.

“Not all of us agree on a personal or moral level on the issue of abortion,” they wrote. “But we stand together in our firm belief that prosecutors have a responsibility to refrain from using limited criminal legal system resources to criminalize personal medical decisions.”

They argue that enforcing abortion bans runs counter to their sworn obligation to protect the safety and well-being of their communities, since it would erode trust in the legal system, divert resources from the enforcement of serious crime and

Read the rest
More

Oklahoma law calls for governor to appoint new DA after Hammer death

  • July 9, 2022
District attorney candidate David Hammer speaks during a forum Monday night in Shawnee.

Following the death Sunday of David Hammer, who recently won the district attorney race for Pottawatomie and Lincoln counties, Oklahoma state law appears to call for the governor to appoint a new top prosecutor for District 23.

While earning more than 58% of the vote, Hammer, 47, handily defeated embattled incumbent Allan Grubb and Tanya Roland, each fellow Republicans, in the June 28 election.

Five days later, Hammer’s family announced his death on social media. Sources told The Oklahoman that Hammer died from a heart attack.

Hammer pledged to make trust and transparency the hallmarks of his office, saying “citizens deserve to have complete confidence in how public monies are being managed and spent with no excuses.”

Hammer was slated to take office in January. With Grubb expected to serve out his term, a vacancy wouldn’t arise until the new year.

Oklahoma law requires the governor to fill the vacancy through an appointment.

According to Title 26 of state law, which concerns elections:

“In the event a deceased candidate is certified by the appropriate Election Board as having won an election, a vacancy in the office shall occur upon the date the candidate would have taken office, and the vacancy shall be filled in the manner prescribed by law. ”

County election boards met July 1 to certify their elections.

Title 19 of state law, which concerns counties and county officers, says whenever the office of district attorney shall be vacated “by reason of resignation or death of the district attorney, the Governor of the State of Oklahoma shall appoint a qualified person to serve the balance of the unexpired terms of said office.”

Republican Gov. Kevin Stitt is vying to be re-elected to a second term in the November election against Democrat Joy Hofmeister.

Stitt recently has made

Read the rest
More

District attorneys, like this one in Texas, are vowing not to prosecute abortion : NPR

  • July 5, 2022

District Attorney José Garza, pictured in Austin, Texas, in 2021. He is one of nearly 90 elected prosecutors from across the country who has publicly pledged not to persecute those seeking or providing abortions.

The Washington Post via Getty Images


hide caption

toggle caption

The Washington Post via Getty Images


District Attorney José Garza, pictured in Austin, Texas, in 2021. He is one of nearly 90 elected prosecutors from across the country who has publicly pledged not to persecute those seeking or providing abortions.

The Washington Post via Getty Images

The US Supreme Court’s reversal of Roe v. Wade leaves decisions about abortion access up to states, many of which have moved swiftly to limit it.

And while dozens of states were prepared with trigger laws that would immediately ban or restrict abortions, some are now encountering obstacles in implementation and enforcement. The pushback is coming from within their own borders, in the form of legal challenges from abortion rights advocates and opposition from local prosecutors.

Judges in states including Louisiana and Utah have temporarily blocked abortion bans from taking effect in order to hear challenges against them. And dozens of local prosecutors across the country have publicly pledged not to prosecute people who seek, facilitate or provide abortions.

in a joint statement originally issued Friday, 88 elected prosecutors — mostly district attorneys and attorneys general — vowed not to prosecute abortions, calling the criminalization of abortion care “a mockery of justice.”

The prosecutors come from counties in both blue and red states, including those with strict anti-abortion laws including Georgia and Texas. They collectively represent more than 91.5 million people from 30 states and territories as well as Washington, DC, according to Fair and Just Prosecutionthe group that organized and distributed the statement.

“Not all of us agree

Read the rest